connecting to nature

Small Owls

 

OWL PHOTOS

WILLOW,  saw-whet owl

Willow, a Northern Saw-Whet Owl, was hit by a car during fall migration and brought to Hawk Creek. He sustained permanent vision loss which is imperative for hunting and survival, as a result, He is non-releasable. While hunting, owls often fly low across roads focused only on their prey, not on approaching vehicles. Collisions with vehicles account for over 60% of the injuries to raptors admitted to rehabilitation facilities.

Hatched: Unknown, Arrived as an Adult: 10/29/2008

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I V Y,  eastern screech owl

Ivy came to Hawk Creek as a rehab patient. Despite a broken wing and damage to her beak, this tough little owl survived for several days after being hit by a car. Hawk Creek provided the care she needed, including surgery to pin her broken wing in place. Unfortunately she will never be able to fly. Ivy has a unique piebald coloration which is a result of abnormal melanin levels.

Hatched: Unknown, Arrived: 1/21/2015

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SIENNA,  eastern screech owl

Sienna came to us from the Wildlife Center of Virginia. We believe she was a hurricane victim because she was found in a downed tree. Wounds on her face suggest she had been bullied by her siblings, none of whom had survived the crash. She has also suffered permanent hearing loss. An uncommon sight in Western New York, red-phased eastern screech owls are typically found in the South, where their red feathers provide better camouflage against the local tree bark.

Hatched: 5/1/2004, Arrived as an Adult: 10/24/2004

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ACORN,  eastern screech owl

Acorn, an Eastern Screech Owl, was found injured on the side of the road, most likely from a collision with a vehicle. He sustained eye damage that left him blind in his left eye. Since owls use their keen night vision to find prey, Acorn would be unable to hunt and survive in the wild. The second smallest owl found in the Eastern United States, the grey-phased screech owl is a common sight in Western New York. They can be found from the city to the countryside.

Hatched: 4/5/2005, Arrived: 4/5/2007

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LUNA,  barn owl

This female Barn Owl was hatched at Hawk Creek. A favorite in our education programs, she enchants audiences with her delicate beauty. Barn owls have been associated with the supernatural, witchcraft, omens, and even death. Many ghost stories are believed to have originated from encounters with them. With their light undersides, dark eyes, screams, and “glowing” properties, it can be enough to frighten anyone! Her role here is to dispel these myths through education.

Hatched: 4/2009, Arrived: 4/20/2009

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SOREN,  barn owl

This male Barn Owl was hatched at Hawk Creek. A favorite in our education programs, he enchants audiences with his delicate beauty. Barn owls have been associated with the supernatural, witchcraft, omens, and even death. Many ghost stories are believed to have originated from encounters with them. Soren is a member of our flying team, giving audiences the chance to witness the remarkable silent flight of the Barn Owl.

Hatched at Hawk Creek: 5/1/2011

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ZEUS AND HERA,  barn owls

This breeding pair of barn owls, named after figures in Greek mythology, came to us from Arizona with permanent wing injuries which made them both non-releasable. Zeus and Hera are wonderful parents that dedicate themselves to raising healthy chicks. Captive breeding programs along with habitat conservation are vital to maintaining sustainable populations of barn owls.

Arrived as Adults: 9/28/2008

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