Temujin
Temujin
gyrfalcon

 
Adopt Factsheet

This male Gyrfalcon was a gift from Northwoods Falconry to Hawk Creek in appreciation of Director Loretta Jones’ efforts to preserve the endangered Houbara Bustard, a large ground bird in the Middle East.  Temujin is an exciting member of our educational team because, as an Arctic ambassador, he represents animals that can survive in temperatures as cold as -70 degrees!  This species thrives in weather much harsher than even the worst Buffalo winters.

Hatched: 5/7/2007 Arrived: 6/13/2007    


Blaze
Blaze
peregrine falcon

 
Adopt Factsheet

This Peregrine Falcon was placed here in 2005 by the World Bird Sanctuary of St. Louis, MO.  Blaze sustained permanent wing damage from crashing into a window of a skyscraper.  He still had his juvenile plumage when he was rescued, which tells us he was in his second year.  Blaze is a highly valued member of our educational team allowing people the opportunity to come face to face with a peregrine falcon, when diving in a stoop peregrines have been recorded at speeds over 280 mph. This feathered missal is the fastest species on the planet!

Hatched: 4/1/2003 Arrived: 6/23/2005    

Zephyr
Zephyr
peregrine falcon

 
Adopt Factsheet

Zephyr, a female Peregrine Falcon, was found in Niagara County with a permanent wing injury when she was only six months old.  Her leg band tells us that she was hatched to wild parents using an artificial nest site on a smokestack in Eastlake, Ohio.  She traveled over 200 hundred miles to live near another smokestack on Lake Ontario, where she was injured. 

 

Hatched: 5/1/2008 Arrived: 2/15/2009    

Arrow
Arrow
American kestrel

 
Adopt Factsheet

This male American Kestrel came to Hawk Creek from another rehabilitator in the Southern Tier. Arrow was rescued by a concerned citizen that found him very weak and with mites that were destroying his feathers. After proper nutrition and mite medication he regained his strength but was still unable to fly well enough to hunt. American Kestrels, while not as fast as their cousins the peregrine falcon, have the unique ability to hover in a field while hunting.

 

Hatched: Unknown Arrived: 7/17/2009    

Fernando
Fernando
Andean condor

 
Adopt Factsheet

Fernando is an Andean Condor, one of the largest flying birds in the world. He was part of a breeding reintroduction program at the World Bird Sanctuary of St. Louis, MO, but his condor foster parents attacked him.  He received 150 stitches in his leg making him non-releasable into the wild because of permanent leg and eye damage.  They are rare in the Andes Mountains due to habitat loss and secondary poisoning by farmers, stemming from the misconception that condors attack livestock. 

 

Hatched: 5/11/1985 Arrived: 8/29/2002    

Barf
Barf
turkey vulture

 
Adopt Factsheet

The turkey vulture’s natural defense mechanism, vomiting, is certainly unique.  The appropriately named Barf is a human imprint from St. Louis, MO.  He was rescued by the World Bird Sanctuary, who were notified of a turkey vulture that kept following people around begging for food.   Since imprinting is irreversible, he will remain with us as an example of the need for proper wildlife rehabilitation training.

 

Hatched: 5/1/2004 Arrived: 6/23/2005    

Dynasty
Dynasty
Egyptian vulture

 
Adopt Factsheet

The World Bird Sanctuary rescued this female Egyptian Vulture from an exotic animal dealer.  She spent the next eight years in their breeding program.  After the death of her mate, she came to Hawk Creek.  At the time of her arrival, she was one of only six Egyptian vultures in the country.  She is extremely intelligent, and her species is one of the few birds of prey that uses tools to attain a goal. A prime example of this is their use of a rock to break open an egg.

 

Rescued as an Adult: 1987 Arrived: 7/20/2000